Get rid of the content no one reads. Offer surprises and “candy.” And other tricks for retaining subscribers.

If news organizations want to attract and retain subscribers, they need to look to psychology…and nudge, nudge, and nudge again: That’s one big takeaway from a recent summit on engagement. And here’s another idea: What if you simply got rid of content that readers don’t read? INMA’s November Consumer Engagement Summit (led by 2016 Nieman…

Continue Reading

What is the restaurant critic’s “duty to warn” in the age of the best-of listicle?

“I often think about our duty to warn. Mostly because, when we’ve neglected to, it’s ended up being a shitshow.” Thrillist has a fascinating piece from James Beard Award-winning food writer Kevin Alexander about how his rating of a small Portland, Oregon restaurant, Stanich’s, as Thrillist’s best burger in America inadvertently contributed to the restaurant’s…

Continue Reading

Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard

This week, the BBC devoted attention to a series on the spread of false information: The BBC is launching a series today on disinformation and fake news, with documentaries, reports and features on TV, radio and online. There are conferences in Delhi and Nairobi, and new research from India and Africa into why people spread…

Continue Reading

Facebook probably didn’t want to be denying it paid people to create fake news this week, but here we are

Notifications every 2 minutes. The most interesting real-news-about-fake-news this week was the BBC’s in-depth research into how information — and misinformation — spreads via WhatApp in India. Read all about that here. (Also elsewhere on Nieman Lab, be sure to check out this piece by Francesco Marconi and Till Daldrup on how The Wall Street…

Continue Reading