Elections in India and the EU mean a flood of homegrown fake news

“Stupefying speed.” Bloomberg checked in with Vishvas News, Facebook’s largest Indian-language fact-checking contractor, to see how things went during India’s general elections. (Results announced Thursday gave Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s BJP party a landslide victory.). Pallavi Mishra, Vishvas’ manager, “spent two weeks recently talking with internet users in small cities. She found most people are…

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From “climate change” to “climate emergency, crisis or breakdown”: The Guardian is changing the environmental language it uses

Human-caused climate change is arguably the largest crisis facing the world’s population of more than 7 billion, but news organizations have struggled to cover it adequately. “Newsroom managers have failed to see the climate crisis as fundamental, all-encompassing, and worthy of attention from every journalist on their payrolls,” Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope wrote in…

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This is how an Iranian network created a “disinformation supply chain” to spread fake news

If you ever see an article on n13m4nl4b.org, it’s fake. The Citizen Lab at University of Toronto released a case study of Endless Mayfly, “an Iran-aligned network of inauthentic websites and online personas used to spread false and divisive information primarily targeting Saudi Arabia, the United States, and Israel.” Here’s how the “disinformation supply chain”…

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Black female gun owners, moderate Republicans, and Jewish Americans are among the groups that may be particular targets of misinformation in 2020

“Passive misinformation” is a problem for The Hill and other mainstream media outlets. The liberal Media Matters did a study of how news organizations handle misleading claims and lies from Trump. “Passive misinformation is a problem for outlets across the board,” they found after a review of “more than 54,000 tweets sent between 12 a.m….

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The New York Times launches its (evidence-driven, non-judgy) Parenting vertical, with an eye toward making it a subscription product

Over about five years, The New York Times developed its Cooking product from a bunch of unmonetized recipes floating around its website, to a free website and app, to a paid app and vibrant community. With Parenting, a product launched in beta Wednesday after about a year in development, the Times has similar ambitions. “We’re…

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