There is “nothing resembling consensus” about whether the online misinformation problem can actually be solved

It can be nice to hear from experts (even the so-called experts) how things are going to shake out. But in the case of fake news and misinformation online, unfortunately, all we have is more uncertainty: 51 percent of “internet and technology experts” surveyed by the Pew Research Center and Elon University’s Imagining the Internet…

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Even smart people are shockingly bad at analyzing sources online. This might be an actual solution.

Many smart people are still very bad at evaluating sources. Stanford’s Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew observed “10 Ph.D. historians, 10 professional fact checkers, and 25 Stanford University undergraduates…as they evaluated live websites and searched for information on social and political issues.” What they found: Historians and students often fell victim to easily manipulated features…

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The Russian ads Facebook turned over to Congress are the tip of the iceberg 😬

“They were working to lead people along and develop a sense of trust.” Jonathan Albright, the research director at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, on Thursday published to Tableau his research into how six election-related, now-closed, Russian-controlled Facebook accounts spread content in the U.S. The Washington Post’s Craig Timberg wrote up Albright’s findings: For…

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Crooked Media expands from podcasts to text, with a new site and plans for investigative reporting

Crooked Media, the progressive political podcast network run by former Obama administration staffers whose flagship show Pod Save America has been downloaded more than 100 million times since January, is branching out into text. On Wednesday, the L.A.-based company announced the launch of Crooked.com, a website whose editor-in-chief is Brian Beutler, formerly a senior editor…

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The Shorenstein Center will figure out best practices for single-subject news sites, with $683K from Knight

Single-subject news sites are (obviously!) focused on single subjects, from education (Chalkbeat) to criminal justice (The Marshall Project) to gun violence (The Trace), but what do they have in common, what can they learn from each other, and what can other single-subject news sites learn from them? Those are questions that the Harvard Kennedy School’s…

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