How Tribune Publishing, The Guardian, and Slate tackled reader revenue by valuing their journalism more

Reader revenue, reader revenue, reader revenue. It’s much easier said than done, but these two case studies from Tribune Publishing, the Guardian, and Slate prove that it’s possible. In a report from Digital Content Next and the Lenfest Institute, Matt Skibinski and Rande Price outline the for-profit and nonprofit approaches to increasing readers’ contributions, a…

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Inside Inside’s new local newsletters and its plans to keep scaling (with 750,000 active subscribers on board)

Surprise: Subscribers to a nerdy bitcoin newsletter are just about as engaged as subscribers to a nerdy local newsletter. Inside.com, the startup that waited over a decade for the domain with its core product now in the inbox and not the browser, focuses on growing relationships using curated email newsletters to grab your attention. Last…

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How Capital Public Radio covered a community’s high suicide rate (and developed a tool for residents to keep)

Covering suicides has, sadly, become more and more codified in the journalism industry — literally, here’s a site called Reporting on Suicide. Don’t include how they died, link to a support hotline or other resources in the piece, use words like “died by suicide” instead of “successful attempt.” But that’s been largely reactive as more…

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In a hot week for audio, paid newsletterer Substack introduces a way for podcasters to earn money

In another snippet of podcast news this week — wait, you didn’t see the three pieces about the Spotify/Gimlet/Anchor news? — Substack, the all-in-one independent (paid) newsletter provider, is now offering support for subscriber-only audio, too. The added feature won’t make the same kind of splash as Spotify’s $230 million buy, of course. But Substack…

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Transparency, diversity, philanthropy: The Knight Commission’s final recommendations for 21st-century journalism

Radical transparency, committed philanthropy, disinformation-debunking technology, organizational diversity — and a year of service: There are some of the recommendations from the 27-member Knight Commission on Trust, Media, and Democracy, highlighting examples of successful experiments in a 200-plus page report a year and a half in the making. “We, as individual citizens of a great…

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“It doesn’t seem like we’re striving to make third-party fact checking more practical for publishers — it seems like we’re striving to make it easier for Facebook”

Happy anniversary, Facebook: Snopes quit your fact-checking partnership. Poynter’s Daniel Funke reported Friday that Snopes has pulled out of the third-party debunking squad Facebook enlisted in 2016. The Associated Press is not currently fact-checking for it either (but apparently hasn’t fully quit), TechCrunch reported. Snopes, the 25-year-old fact-checking site, said Facebook’s system was too manual…

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The layoffs aren’t over yet, and this time they’re at Vice

Another sign things are really dire: Vice is trimming 10 percent of its workforce, around 250 people, the Hollywood Reporter first reported. The weather is cold, media is colder.https://t.co/aX116dGiTt — Jozen (say Joe-Zen) (@jozenc) February 1, 2019 It’s a smaller percentage of the workforce than the 15 percent BuzzFeed started cutting last week, but each…

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