The New Media Ethics: The state doesn’t have to kill journalists to silence them

In his latest blog on the ethics of journalism, George Pitcher claims that every journalist has a duty to honour those who die for their work by bearing witness to the truth. In the north-east corner of St Bride’s in London’s Fleet Street – the “journalists’ church” and their spiritual home – stands the Journalists’ Altar, sometimes still called the […]

Continue Reading

The New Media Ethics: Lessons from how the BBC failed to consider the consequences of its Cliff Richard story

In his latest blog on the ethics of journalism, George Pitcher considers how the philosophical school of consequentialism can save media groups time and money When the pop-star Sir Cliff Richard won his case in the High Court in July against the BBC for invasion of his privacy, over a spurious child-abuse investigation, the subsequent media attention focused on two […]

Continue Reading

The New Media Ethics: Why it’s morally more hazardous to own social media than an old newspaper

In the second part of his examination of media ownership, George Pitcher concludes that social-media operators can’t operate in a moral vacuum In last week’s blog, I traced a continuum of meanness between the old press barons, such as Lord Beaverbrook, and the new media owners, such as Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos. Both kinds were and are […]

Continue Reading

The New Media Ethics: Journalism has never been respectable, but journalists should have self-respect (guest blog – first in a series)

This article by journalist George Pitcher is the first of a series looking at journalism and ethics.   A big problem with calling out journalism for a decline in its ethical standards is that it can imply there was ever a golden age in what used to be “Fleet Street”. It’s a romantic fantasy of Old Journalism, viewed through ink-tinted […]

Continue Reading